Non-Toxic Weed Killer

Good for use in yards with Pets & Children roaming around! 1/2 gallon of Apple Cider Vinegar 1/4 c table salt 1/2 tsp Dawn liquid dish soap Mix above ingredients in a spray bottle. Spray weeds thoroughly. 1/2 gallon for around $6.40 Works better than Round Up – kills weeds on 1st application. The Dawn dish soap strips the weed of its protective oils so the vinegar can work with deadly force. Safe for use in yards used by children and pets!!

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Got a sunburn after an event?

Spread Malt Vinegar liberally over the affected area(s). Won’t make you particularly socially acceptable for the day, but will get rid of the burn!!

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History of the ‘Dane-a-Thon’

Spring, 2003 The first event was held on the grounds at Langdon Hall (Doon, ON) and was by invitation only. The original idea behind the Dane-a-Thon concept was let us to reunite with the Danes that had been recently adopted and simply have a fun day on a long walk around Langdon’s beautiful trails. There was a total of 28 participants and 30 dogs. There were no booths or toilet facilities (I’m sure the grass at Langdon is greener because of that!) because the owners of Landon didn’t feel these fitted with the image they wanted to portray to their high paying hotel guests. We did, however, have Dr. Ken Burgess for vetting and St. John Ambulance in attendance from the very first event. Arrangements were made with 2 breed clubs to participate in the annual Specialty Show held near St. Catherines. There, we were allowed to have a Sales table and conduct a Silent Auction (with restrictions as to how many items we could offer) to meet the increased financial burden of caring for rescued Danes. Our only sources of income up to this point were donations and the proceeds from Sales and Silent Auctions. Spring, 2004 Invitation to the Dane-a-Thons was extended to the public and all breeds were able to attend. Spring, 2007 The arrangement with the breed clubs continued until the fall of 2006. After the fall Specialty Show, they decided our tables were taking money out of the participants’ pockets, monies that could be spent on their own Silent Auction and we were told to cease participation. A sad reflection on the breed clubs when they won’t support rescue efforts! After discussion, the owners of Langdon Hall allowed us to set up 2 booths for our Sales and Silent Auction, but would still not allow toilet facilities. (I’m sure they were still thinking of how green their grass had become!) Through Internet exposure, extensive advertising and our solid reputation with the Dane community, our presence had become widely known throughout ON, and more people were attending our popular events. The numbers of rescues had dramatically increased over the years and our costs were escalating dramatically. Pledges were introduced to supplement the funds necessary to survive. Fall, 2008 The fall event saw a huge increase in the number of participants. Cars were lined up all the way down Langdon’s long driveway (about 1 kilometer long) to the Blair Road There were so many vehicles that virtually all the parking at Langdon was exhausted! It was, however, a fabulous event, but we could foresee problems with the venue due to concerns raised by Langdon owners about the lack of parking for their paying guests. Spring, 2009 After a particularly wet spring (memories of this year!), volunteers had set up the trail signs around the Langdon trails on the Saturday before the scheduled event and were enjoying a celebratory meal that evening, pumping ourselves up for the following day. During the meal, we received a call from one of the Langdon owners informing us that parking could not be accommodated at their location. Our only options were to either cancel the event (not possible the night before) or find an alternate venue. An organization called rare owned an adjacent property and the decision was made to change...

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Tidbits on a variety of topics

Your Dane’s life vs. cash availability If you’ve ever had to make the decision about life-saving surgery (usually $$$$) for your Dane and found your bankbook couldn’t stand the shock, you’ll be able to relate to this. Medical Insurance is readily available for your pet from a variety of sources which I’ll leave for your own research. Whether it saves you money in the long run depends on the vet care your Dane will need, but it can prevent the ‘drastic decision’, and subsequent regrets, having to be made based on (lack of) funds. The Insurers (them) will let the policy holder (you) pay a monthly premium which can range from $40 and up. If your dog needs vet attention, you pay for it up front and then submit the claim with receipts to ‘them’. A typical policy will pay approx. 80% of the bill – the remaining 20% (co-insurance) is the portion you have to pick up on your own. Provided you read the fine print and know how the payable amounts are calculated, you won’t be surprised when their payment arrives. If major surgeries are required, you will probably gain by being insured, and you win. If, on the other hand, your Dane sails through life with few medical problems, they win. Insurance is an option to let you sleep soundly, with the only other benefit being that a portion of most vet costs will be paid by them. ‘Leaky’ middle-aged spayed female Danes: One of my older females had this problem and, after having to change the bed sheets every night for about 10 months (yes, she slept in bed with me!!), I casually mentioned it to my vet when visiting for another problem. There is an easy solution for this. She was prescribed Stilbestrol, ended up taking 1 tablet per week for the rest of her life, and the nightly bed sheet changing was eliminated! Discuss this with your vet to make sure there isn’t another reason for leakage. Your Dane is feeling the effects of aging or having problems with mobility: Ask your vet about a series of 4 Cartrophen shots. I’ve used this on many of my Danes when they get older and it works absolute wonders. After the 2nd visit, you’ll see a difference. After the last vaccine, your biggest problem may be restraining your Dane from over-exerting...

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